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Visiting Scholars

Evelyn Nien-Ming Ch'ien

Distinguished Practitioner
Jean-Moulin Universite Lyon III
chien012@gmail.com

Evelyn Nien-Ming Ch'ien is currently a senior researcher at Jean-Moulin Universite Lyon III in France.  In 2014 she was awarded funding from the European Union to develop an archive on descendants of the Republican period in China (1911-49) and is currently working on this project.  In 2012 she was a Fulbright Senior Research Fellow at Sun-Yat Sen University.  Her most recent publication project is a two-volume set of annotated poetry by a diplomat and poet who wrote during these periods (forthcoming Guangdong People's Press, 2015 and co-edited with Puk Wing-kin).  Her first book, Weird English (Harvard University Press 2004) examined diaspora writers and their culturally hybrid Englishes. 

Ming Chan

Distinguished Practitioner
Stanford University
mingkchan2009@gmail.com

Ming Chan was a Research Fellow (’76-80/99-09) in the Hoover Institution at Stanford where he obtained his PhD. He has taught at UCLA, Duke, Mount Holyoke, University of Hong Kong, and held endowed chairs at Swarthmore and Grinnell. Chan is author/editor of 13 volumes and 70+ articles/book chapters on Chinese history, Sino-foreign ties and Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao studies, and is currently editing 2 Macao volumes while continuing his efforts on Hong Kong oral history-documentary archives.

Si Chen

Visiting Student Researcher
Tsinghua University
chens16@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn

Si Chen is a second-year PhD student at Tsinghua University.  Her major is comparative literature and world literature.  Her research focuses on how Chinese literature, especially dramas and movies, responds to the great transformation of modern China in the early 20th century.  She is currently researching the relationship between modern Chinese theater and modern European theater from the perspective of Tian Han, who is the pioneer of the modern Chinese theater movement.  

Photo of Linlin Hu

Linlin Hu

Visiting Scholar
Peking Union Medical College
hulinlin@sph.pumc.edu.cn

Dr. Linlin Hu received her PhD from the School of Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University in 2006.  She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health for two years.  She served as a policy analyst at the Chinese National Academy of Governance from 2010 to 2014.  She joined the School of Public Health, Peking Union Medical College in 2015 and serves as Executive Chair and Associate Professor of the Department of Health Policy and Management.  Her research includes the study of health systems, health policies, primary care and elder care.  She has authored over 30 academic papers in international and Chinese journals.  

Photo of Yuanyuan Hua

Yuanyuan Hua

Visiting Scholar
Dalian University of Foreign Languages
yyhua@stanford.edu

Yuanyuan Hua is currently an Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and World Literature at Dalian University of Foreign Languages and a Postdoctor at Shanghai Jiaotong University in China.  She was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Central Florida in 2011-2012 developing research on American ecofeminist literature and ecological literature.  Her first book, On American Eco-feminist Literary Criticism, was published by People's Literature Publishing House in 2014.  In 2017 she was awarded funding from The National Social Science Fund of China to develop research on the acceptance of Chinese Taoist thought by American ecological literature in the 20th century and is currently working on this project.  

Zhengfen Ji

Visiting Scholar
Southwest Minzu University
Janeji@stanford.edu

Zhengfen Ji received her PhD in the field of history of modern China from Sichuan University in 2012.  From then on, she was a lecturer in Southwest Minzu University.  Her research focuses on the interaction between the local intellectuals, the state and the local society, including local cultural heritage, the transformation of traditional society, and ethnic relations.  She is the author of the article Research about the change of the Sichuan local culture-- From the perspective of the compilation of the Sichuan local county chronicles (1912-1949, The Forum of Chinese Culture, 114 (October 2015), Chengdu, 59-62) and the co-author of A brief account of the past chronicles of Sichuan (Sichuan Science and Technology Press, 2012).  Her work in progress is the study of how the Yi nationality constructed their national identity and self-identity during the Republic of China.

Fereen Liew

Visiting Scholar
Ministry of Health, Singapore
fereen@gmail.com

Fereen Liew is a policy officer from the Ministry of Health (Singapore).  A physician and Public Health Specialist by training, Fereen started her career by practicing in the public hospitals and polyclinics, before focusing on policy work.  She obtained her Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Dean's List) and Graduate Diploma in Family Medicine from the National University of Singapore in 2004 and 2007 respectively.  She was a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard University in 2007-2008 to pursue her Master of Public Health.  She is currently working on an international collaborative research project on chronic disease management and population aging.

Janice Stockard

Distinguished Practitioner
Stanford University
stockard@stanford.edu

Dr. Janice Stockard is a cultural anthropologist trained in the area of Chinese studies.  Her research and publications focus on the effects of globalization and technological change on gender, family, and marriage primarily in China, but also more broadly cross-culturally. 

This year, one of Stockard’s long-term writing projects has published as a ‘digital-first’ anthropology text, Mapping Cultures Across Space and Time (Cengage 2018), which provides greater in-depth focus on China than any previous text.  Stockard is currently completing a second long-term project, “Silk Roads to New England, 1760-1860,” which is a work in historical ethnography – and a companion volume to her earlier ethnography, Daughters of the Canton Delta: Marriage Patterns and Economic Strategies in South China, 1860-1930 (Stanford 1989).  Both works focus on the rise and decline of a silk industry, tracking developments in technology, marriage, and gender within regional silk cultures. 

Stockard has also co-edited an anthology (Globalization and Change in Fifteen Cultures), authored a widely used text on cross-cultural marriage practices (Marriage in Culture), and served as Co-Editor of the Spindler anthropology series ‘Case Studies in Cultural Anthropology’ (2005-15).  She currently serves on the Social Science Advisory Board at the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT).  Stockard received her degrees in anthropology from Stanford. 

Selia Tan

Visiting Scholar
Wuyi University
diaoloutan@qq.com

Jinhua Tan, Selia, is a historian on the history and social development of the hometown society of the overseas Chinese from Guangdong Province and she is also a trained and practiced architectural heritage conservationist.  Selia has worked at Wuyi University since 2009 and is now a full-time associate professor in the Department of Architecture and a researcher at the Qiaoxiang Cultural Research Center of China.  She has been working closely with Stanford University for the Chinese Railroad Worker Project since 2012 and is now a consultant on cultural heritage conservation projects in China. The Kaiping Cangdong Cultural Heritage Conservation Project, supervised by her, was awarded the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Cultural Heritage Conservation Award of Merit in 2015.  Selia finished her Master's Degree and PhD at the Department of Architecture at the University of Hong and is the author of Research on the Architectural Ornamentation of Kaiping Diaolou and Villages (2013) and A Journey of the Kaiping Dwellings (2011), as well as editor of A Humble Wish: A Family Story of Overseas Chinese (2013).

Helen Young

Helen Young

Distinguished Practitioner
Independent Scholar
hybj@stanford.edu

Helen Young is author of Choosing Revolution: Chinese Women Soldiers on the Long March (University of Illinois Press, 2001). She continues to pursue research, writing, and lecturing on the experience of women in modern Chinese history.

Zhe Yuan

Visiting Scholar
Donghua University
yuanzhe@dhu.edu.cn

Zhe Yuan is an Associate Professor of Donghua University in Shanghai, where her research and teaching focus on modern Chinese history.  She completed her PhD in History at Fudan University.  Her current project, "The China Youth Party and the political activism of foreign-trained students in modern China," reconsiders party politics in modern China by focusing on the third largest party in modern China, the China Youth Party.  During her stay at Stanford, she works mainly on the private archives of Zeng Qi held at the Hoover Institution Archives, as well as other rare collections at Hoover and the East Asia Library.  She also plans to conduct oral history interviews with family members of Youth Party leaders, many of whom now reside in the US.

Muyun Zhang

Visiting Student Researcher
Tsinghua University
zhangmuy16@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn

Muyun Zhang received her BA from Renmin University of China and she is a second year PhD student at Tsinghua University researching the history of Modern China.  Her publications include "The Transition of the Kuomintang Government's Policies Towards Korean Immigrants in Northeast China" (International Journal of Korean History) and "Repositioning of Mass Organizations in the United Front: Taking the National Liberation Vanguards of China as an Example" (The China Non-Profit Review).  Her current research interests center on the history of the foreign policy of the Communist Party of China (CPC) and the relations between the CPC and transnational communities such as Chinese immigrants, students abroad, foreign correspondents, and non-governmental organizations during the mid-twentieth century.  Using the collections at Hoover Archives, she intends to examine how the CPC wove a transnational social network during the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Photo of Xinmin Zhou

Xinmin Zhou

Visiting Scholar
Hubei University
zhouxmrr@stanford.edu

Xinmin Zhou received his PhD in the field of literature from Wuhan University in 2002.  He is currently a professor and doctoral tutor of Hubei University.  His publications include The Appearance and Change of "Man": the Study of Human Discourse in the Nearly 30 Years of Chinese Novels, The Interview of Chinese "post-60s writers,"  and the Dimension of Contemporary Novel Criticism.  At present, Professor Zhou mainly studies Chinese contemporary novels, literary criticism and contemporary literature history.  He especially has his own opinion on the current development of Chinese literature.