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Current Visiting Scholars

Yue Fu
  • China
Visiting Scholar

Yue Fu is a visiting scholar at the Center for East Asian Studies since September 2023. Her supervisor is Professor Li Liu. Between 2000-2010, she received her B.A., M.A . and Ph.D in History (Archaeology Major) from Wuhan University in China. Then she taught Chinese Archaeology at Department of Culturology, School of History and Culture, Center China Normal University and became an associate professor in 2013. Her research interests include Chinese archaeology of the Shang and Zhou Dynasties as well as the Chu Culture, especially archaeological culture of the Western Zhou in the Midstream of the Yangtze River. From 2018 to 2019, she was a visiting scholar guided by Professor Lothar von Falkenhausen at the Center for Chinese Studies, UCLA. She was also a visiting scholar at the Stanford Archaeology Center(2022-2023).

Ellen Huang
  • China
Distinguished Practitioner

Ellen Huang, Ph.D., researches the relationship between art, science and materials focusing on design and China. Huang has published for museum publications and academic journals about Buddhist material culture and ink painting, taught and researched in Taipei, Beijing, Seoul, and Shanghai and held positions at university art museums as a curator. Selected exhibitions include Ink Worlds (2018), Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln (2018), The Buddha’s Word (2018), and Clouding: Sign and Symbol in Asian Art (2021). She is a faculty member at the ArtCenter College of Design (Pasadena, CA) where she teaches art and design histories. She is completing a manuscript about Jingdezhen porcelain in the early modern world as a translated practice.

Haifeng Hui in front of a canal and trees
  • China
Visiting Scholar
Huazhong University of Science and Technology

Dr. Haifeng Hui (惠海峰) is Professor of English at the School of Foreign Languages, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. He researches children’s literature from diverse theoretical perspectives, including narratology, stylistics, adaptation studies, and digital humanities. He serves as an Advisor Board member of International Research in Children's Literature, and an editor of Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures. He received his B.A. (2003), M.A. (2006) and Ph.D. (2012) from Peking University. He is also a visiting scholar at University of California at Los Angeles (2014-2015). Haifeng’s recent publications include Adaptation of British Literary Classics for Children (Peking University Press, 2019), “Canon Studies in China: Traditions, Modernization and Revisions in the Global Context,” Poetics Today (2021), “Embedded Mental States in Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief and Uneven Distribution of Narratorial Attention,” Orbis Litterarrum (2023), “What Can Digital Humanities Do for Literary Adaptation Studies: Distant Reading of Children's Editions of Robinson Crusoe,” Digital Scholarship in the Humanities (2023).

Qingli Meng headshot
  • China
Visiting Scholar

Qingli Meng, Ph.D., is a professor at Liaoning University, China. She teaches courses in various areas, such as “History of Chinese Literature”, “Tang and Song Ci”, and “Song Dynasty Zixue Literature”. She focuses on the study of ancient Chinese poetry and prose, especially the relationship between literature and Schools of Thought. She hosted the Chinese National Social Science Fund Research on the Dialectical Thinking Mode and Chinese Spirit in the Pre-Qin Period. In addition, she published books and articles on Chinese ancient literature, such as Thousands of Poems, Thousands of Ci, etc. She was awarded as the May 1st Women's Advanced Individual by the Committee of Education and Culture of Shenyang. She received the Provincial Philosophy and Social Sciences Achievement Award in Liaoning for her research achievements. She was a visiting scholar at the State University of New York at Binghamton (SUNY Binghamton) from 2017 to 2018 and developed a strong interest in Sinology. Currently, she is conducting research under Professor Egan’s supervision on Su Shi and the study of American Song Dynasty literature at Stanford University.

Jeeyoung Peck headshot
  • China
Visiting Scholar
Hanyang University

Jeeyoung Peck is a Professor in the Department of Chinese Language and Literature at Hanyang University, Seoul. Before joining Hanyang University, she served as an Assistant Professor at the University of the Pacific in Stockton (2008-2012). She earned her Ph.D. from the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University in 2008. Her primary research interests include the aspect system and the interface between lexical semantics and argument realization patterns in Modern Chinese. Additionally, she explores syntactic change in the history of Chinese and second language acquisition. During her visit at Stanford University, she will investigate the linguistic encoding system of temporal information in Modern Chinese.

Janice Stockard outdoors
  • China
Distinguished Practitioner
Stanford University

Janice Stockard, Ph.D., is a cultural anthropologist specializing in Chinese studies. Her research and publications focus on the effects of globalization and technological change on gender, family, and marriage in China – and cross-culturally. She recently co-authored the first digital cultural anthropology text, Cultural Anthropology: Mapping Cultures Across Space and Time (Cengage 2018), providing students with greater in-depth focus on China than any other introductory text.

Stockard’s first ethnography, Daughters of the Canton Delta: Marriage Patterns and Economic Strategies in South China, 1860-1930, was based on the three years she spent interviewing South China silk workers. Originally published by Stanford Press (1989), Daughters is currently being translated for publication in China. For the new 2024 Chinese edition, Stockard is working with her original research assistant to develop a new introduction focused on strategies of ethnographic interviewing.

In a new expanded 2023 manuscript (under review) Stockard, focuses on the rise and decline of another silk industry. In Tree, Worm & Reel: Silk Roads through New England, 1750-1950, Stockard tracks early U.S. experiments to develop a domestic silk industry, the rise of a regional New England silk culture and its roads back to China.

Jing Yan headshot
  • China
Visiting Scholar

Jing Yan, Ph.D., She is Associate Professor of Beijing Dance Academy. She was previously the Executive Director of Beijing Philosophy and Social Science Research Center for Minzu Dance and has 23 years of experience as a university teacher. Jing Yan's research focuses on world traditional dance culture and art anthropology. Her works, such as Ethnic Group Sharing of Physical Experience—A Study of Circle Dance of Mixed Ethnic Groups Cohabitating in Lanping, Yunnan, Images about the Chinese Dance Culture, Dance with People—Field Study and Application Research of Chinese Folk Dance mainly focus on the study of dance of ethnic minorities in China. She is currently a curator at the China Dance Museum of Beijing Dance Academy and has led multiple projects and curated several dance exhibitions. In recent years, she has been to India, Nepal, Cambodia, Vietnam, Italy, Switzerland and other countries for academic exchanges and visits. She holds a Ph.D degree from Minzu University of China and M.A. from Beijing Dance Academy.

Weiwei Ye
  • China
Visiting Scholar

Weiwei YE, Ph.D., is an ecocritic and intercultural literary scholar specializing in American indigenous studies, ecocriticism theory from the comparative perspective. Her recent research and publications focus on environmental studies in American and Chinese academic fields and their relations with the effects of globalization in the age of the viro-cene, especially the narratives of the Virocene in Sci-fiction. She approaches her research from an international philosophy and axiology perspective and already get two books and several academic articles published in related fields; you can expect her forthcoming book titled “On the Diagram of American Ecocriticism in the 21st Century” (Shanghai Sanlian Bookstore, 2023, IBSN: 9787542682765), which is also relevant to ecocritical studies on American indigenous studies and environmental justice narratives.

Weiwei YE’s recent projects, including the collaborative efforts with Prof. Ban Wang at Stanford University here, are endeavoring to shape a new paradigm of sci-fiction criticism with a reflexive nature by merging the ecocritical perspective into it. Her current manuscript delves into the virus narrative in American science fiction, scrutinizing the works of Robert Anson Heinlein (1907-1988), Jack Finney (1911-1995), Frank Herbert (1920-1986), Dean Koontz (1945-), Joan Sloane (1928-1995) and Michael Crichton (1966-2008). Through a comparative lens that incorporates Chinese sci-fi works and studies, she seeks to distill the paradoxical and implicative meanings of anti-rationalism depicted in these sci-fi narratives.

Helen  Young
  • China
Distinguished Practitioner
Stanford University

Helen Young is author of Choosing Revolution: Chinese Women Soldiers on the Long March (University of Illinois Press, 2001). She continues to pursue research, writing, and lecturing on the experience of women in modern Chinese history.