Visiting Scholars

The Center for East Asian Studies hosts a small number of visiting scholars each year who reside in the area and conduct research in consultation with a Stanford faculty member. Normally in residence for one academic year, scholars work independently on their own research projects while participating at CEAS events and in the intellectual life at Stanford. For more information about applying to become a CEAS Visiting Scholar, click here. Please note that to become a visiting scholar, you must find a Stanford faculty member to sponsor your visiting scholar status prior to applying at CEAS.

In addition to the scholars listed here, more visiting scholars and visiting fellows who research on East Asia may be found in the following departments, centers, or programs:

Shorenstein-Asia Pacific Research Center
Korean Studies Program
John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships Program
Stanford Humanities Center

  Name
Title / Sponsor
Contact
Home Institution
Research interests
Liang Cai
Visiting Scholar, CEAS
University of Notre Dame
irisliangcai@gmail.com
Liang Cai is an Assistant Professor in the History Department, University of Notre Dame.  She received her Ph.D. from Cornell University in 2007 and has taught at the University of Arkansas.  Her principal area of interest and the focus of her recent research are early Chinese Empires, Classical Chinese thought- in particular Confucianism and Daoism, digital humanities, and the material culture and archaeological texts of early China.  Her book Witchcraft and the Rise of First Confucian Empire is published by SUNY (State University of New York Press) in 2014.  She has published articles in journals such as the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, the Journal of American Oriental Society, and China Scholarship 中國學術.  
Ming Chan
Visiting Scholar, CEAS
Stanford University
mingkchan2009@gmail.com
Ming Chan was a Research Fellow (’76-80/99-09) in the Hoover Institution at Stanford where he obtained his PhD. He has taught at UCLA, Duke, Mount Holyoke, University of Hong Kong, and held endowed chairs at Swarthmore and Grinnell. Chan is author/editor of 13 volumes and 70+ articles/book chapters on Chinese history, Sino-foreign ties and Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao studies, and is currently editing 2 Macao volumes while continuing his efforts on Hong Kong oral history-documentary archives.
Lu Gao
Visiting Scholar, CEAS
Institute fr the History of Natural Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
lucygao83@gmail.com
Dr. Lu Gao is an Associate Professor in the Institute for the History of Natural Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.  She received her PhD from the STS center of Tsinghua University, Beijing.  Her research at Stanford University will focus on the history of technology in modern China and the co-evolution of science, technology and society in modern Chinese Society.  You can see her webpage here.
Minjung Kim
Visiting Scholar, CEAS
POSTECH
rlaalswjd0918@gmail.com
Minjung Kim is an Associate Professor in the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, POSTECH.  She received her PhD from the Department of Korean Language and Literature, Seoul National University.  Recently she has been interested in the gender-identity of women in modern Korean literature, especially in the correlation of gender and nationality in Korean-American novels.
Seong-Hyon Lee
Visiting Scholar, CEAS
Stanford University
boston.sunny@yahoo.com
Dr. Seong-Hyon Lee, a native of Seoul, is 2013-2014 Pantech Fellow at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center of Stanford University.  He is a graduate of Harvard University and Tsinghua University.  He was a KF--Salzburg Global Fellow and the James A. Kelly Fellow of the Pacific Forum CSIS (non-resident).  At CEAS, he will conduct research on the China-North Korea elite relations from 1940s to the present.  
Barbara Mittler
Visiting Scholar, CEAS
University of Heidelberg
barbara.mittler@zo.uni-heidelberg.de
Barbara Mittler holds a Chair in Chinese Studies at the Institute of Chinese Studies, University of Heidelberg and is Director of the Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies (HCTS).  Her research focuses on cultural production in (greater) China covering a wide range of topics from music to (visual) and (historical) print media in China's long modernity.  She has published numerous research papers and three book-length studies: Dangerous Tunes: The Politics of Chinese Music in Hong Kong, Taiwan and the People's Republic of China since 1949, Harrassowitz 1997; A Newspaper for China? Power, Identity, and Change in China's News-Media, 1872-1912, Harvard University Press, Asia Center Series, 2004; A Continuous Revolution: Making Sense of Cultural Revolution Culture, Harvard University Press, Asia Center Series, 2012 (Fairbank Prize 2013).  Currently, she is finishing another booklength study on women's magazines, Portrait(s) of a Trope: Making New Women and New Men in Chinese Women's Magazines, 1898-2008.  At Stanford (EALC and Humanities Center), she will begin two new projects, 1. a collaborative project with Sumathi Ramaswamy (Duke) tentatively entitled "Embodying the Nation-- Representations of Gandhi and Mao," 2. Research for a new monograph: "And there is only one Lang Lang..."--Tiger Mothers and Conceptions of Childhood, Music and Education in (Greater) China.
Xiaoyuan Yang
Visiting Student Researcher, CEAS
Chinese National Academy of Arts
blackiceyang@gmail.com
Xiaoyuan Yang is a PhD student in Cultural Policy at the Chinese National Academy of Arts.  His research focuses on the Principal Agent relationship between government, funding organizations, and cultural institutions.  He is currently under the guidance of Prof. Xiaoneng Yang, Curator of the Cantor Art Center at Stanford University.
Helen Young
Independent Scholar, CEAS
Independent Scholar
hybj@stanford.edu
Helen Young is author of Choosing Revolution: Chinese Women Soldiers on the Long March (University of Illinois Press, 2001). She continues to pursue research, writing, and lecturing on the experience of women in modern Chinese history.
Jianhui Yuan
Visiting Scholar, CEAS
Yantai University
jianhui1976@126.com
Prof. Yuan received her PhD from the Department of Chinese Language & Literature, Peking University in ancient Chinese linguistics.  She is currently an Associate Professor at Yantai University.  Her research at Stanford will focus on the influence of language contact on Chinese grammar, and the interactions between syntax, semantics and pragmatics of some sentences.