events

The Banality of Religion: Close Readings of the Everyday

Student Conference

Free and open to the public.
Location: Board Room, Stanford Humanities Center

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE:
"The everyday is the most universal and the most unique condition, the most social and the most individuated, the most obvious and the best hidden"(Henri Lefebvre, "The Everyday and Everydayness"). A graduate student conference dedicated to exploring aspects of everydayness in religious texts, artifacts and practices. The participants' papers present analyses of the ways the ordinary and the usual are represented, performed and lived in religious contexts, and suggest fresh and thought-provoking definitions of 'the banal' and 'the mundane' in religion. We are honored by the presence of two keynote speakers, Professor Robert Orsi of Northwestern University, who will lead a seminar in the opening session of the conference, and Professor James Robson of Harvard University, who will deliver a keynote speech on Saturday afternoon.

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9:30AM-11:45AM
Panel II:

The Mundane as Semiotic: Paul, Divinatory Practices, and Ancient Mediterranean Religiosity
Jennifer Eyl, Brown University

Pleasure, Profit and Pilgrimage: Merged Paths in Early Modern Japan
Caleb Carter, UCLA

Panel III:
The Sacred Becomes Profane: Political Sufis in Medieval Cairo
Nathan Hofer, Emory University

Monk in the World: The Poetry of Canliaozi
Jason Protass, Stanford University

2:00PM - 3:30PM
KEYNOTE SPEECH

When the Everyday Goes Astray: On the Banality of the Religious Exception
James Robson, Harvard University

3:45PM-5:15PM
Panel IV:

Transgressive Idealizations: Female Figures in the Sacred Narrative of Mt. K?ya
Lindsey E. DeWitt, UCLA

The Daily Blend: Everyday Practices in the Jewish Christian Family
Samira Mehta, Emory University

Where Real Church Meets Real Life: An Ethnographic Study of Hybrid Spiritual Practices in an Emerging Church Worship Service
Kyle Bozentko, Boston University

Saturday, May 22, 2010 | 9:30 am — 5:15 pm
The Board Room, Stanford Humanities Center

Department of Religious Studies